Unusual museums of the world

7 the most strange museums of the world

Photo: musamexico.org

“RBC Style” recently told about the most surprising Russian museums. If you want to experience unusual sensations when traveling abroad, check out one of the following places. Here you can scuba dive, walk through working sewers, cook instant noodles and add to the exhibits with your own hair. We have selected eight of the world’s most original museums with very unexpected exhibits. Spoiler: you won’t have to pay to enter some of them.

International Toilet Museum, India

A very unusual museum is located in New Delhi. It has exhibits from fifty countries around the world. They detail the evolution of toilets, and museum staff talk about how the world has changed with the advent of much-needed household plumbing. The collection includes ornate pots, painted urinals, gilded toilets of Roman emperors, all kinds of bidets and even a reproduction of a toilet of Louis XIV. The technological novelties include a microwave toilet bowl with a water-saving function. And the oldest exhibit is more than 4 thousand years old. In addition, there is a rare collection of thematic comics, paintings and poems. The museum was created by Dr. Bindeshwar Pathaka, founder of the environmental volunteer organization Sulabh International. His goal is to make people aware of the dire sanitary situation in India.

Photo: sulabhtoiletmuseum.org

Museum of Bad Art, USA

This is a private art gallery in Boston that houses some 600 of the worst works of art. According to the owners of the museum, these paintings and sculptures are “too bad to ignore.” Antiques dealer Scott Wilson pulled the first piece out of a trash can in 1994; he and his friends bought the rest at flea markets and flea markets. Over the years, the museum’s collection has grown so much that Wilson had to open several branches. By the way, the requirements for the works presented in the gallery are very strict: the selection is made by professionals. For example, when creating them, artists must have the most serious intentions. And that’s why paintings made for fun are not accepted here. The gallery is temporarily closed (a new space is being sought). But for those who want to enjoy bad paintings right now, there is a special calendar for $15.

Photo: museumofbadart.org

Hair Museum, Turkey

The main exhibits of the museum – 16 thousand strands of women’s hair. They decorate the walls and ceilings of a small cave, located under the pottery store. The latter belongs to hereditary Turkish potter Ces Galip. According to legend, his beloved had to move to another city in 1979. In memory of herself, she left a strand of blond hair. To support the unfortunate young man, women began to bring him their locks. And so was born this unusual collection. Twice a year, Chez Galip randomly chooses ten strands and invites their former owners to pottery workshops and a free week’s vacation in Cappadocia. In this way, the man thanks the girls who helped him create the place. Admission to the museum is free, and any visitor can add to its exposition. The main condition is that the hair must be clean, well-groomed and healthy.

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Photo: chezgalip.com

Museum of sewage, France

The sewer system of Paris is a real underground city of 2,100 km in length. It has its own streets, intersections and squares. The first 18 m of the system, laid by the Romans back in 1370, are still under the ruins of the thermae in the Latin Quarter. You can learn more about the history of the French capital’s sewers at the Museum of Sewers. Once upon a time, its workers drove tourists through the sewers in small vans, later in boats. Now you can walk through the dim underground tunnels here, study the structure of the city’s sewer network and listen to the guides’ stories about the different ways to purify water. Be prepared that a peculiar smell will accompany you throughout the tour. Even so, more than 100,000 people come here every year. The museum is currently being renovated and the works should be finished by October.

Photo: wikimedia.org

Mutter Museum, USA

Another unusual and at the same time spooky museum is located in Philadelphia. It features hundreds of alcoholized anomalies of human bodies and antique medical equipment. Among its exhibits are a rich collection of skulls, the tallest human skeleton, the fused liver of Siamese twins, more than 2,000 swallowed objects, deformed organs, tumors of famous people and even slices of Albert Einstein’s brain. Museum creator Dr. Thomas Dent Mütter became famous for helping people with the most severe deformities. During his career, Mütter amassed a collection of amazing specimens that became the museum’s first exhibits in 1863. And there are also themed exhibitions here from time to time. One of them is dedicated to the gruesome injuries of the Civil War. Tourists who have been to the museum are advised to come here on an empty stomach.

Underwater Sculpture Museum, Mexico

There are only two ways to see the exhibits in this museum: go scuba diving or take a ride in a boat with a glass bottom. Beneath the crystal-clear waters of the Caribbean Sea are more than 500 beautiful life-size sculptures covered in bizarre seaweed and coral. For greater stability, each is mounted on a massive base weighing about two tons. And all the exhibits are made of special marine concrete with a neutral pH, which provides favorable conditions for the life of marine creatures. Today this place is considered one of the main attractions in Mexico. And the Underwater Sculpture Museum is also an environmental project designed to divert tourists from the fragile marine ecosystem and protect the Mesoamerican reef. The cost of a dive starts at $90.

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Photo: musamexico.org

The Museum of Instant Noodles, Japan

In the Japanese city of Osaka, you can go to the instant noodle museum. This hearty and easy-to-make instant noodle was developed in 1958 by businessman Momofuku Ando, whose statue stands at the entrance. For most of his life, the Japanese ate noodles, ignoring doctors’ warnings. Despite this, he felt well until his last days and passed away at the age of 96. Momofuku Ando is devoted a separate part of the exposition. For example, in one of the halls stands an exact replica of the barn where he got his first package of noodles. The museum displays almost all kinds of “fast” pasta, brought from different parts of the world. For those who want to create their own ramen, there are cooking classes. Participants will have to knead dough, cut noodles and deep-fry them. And you can evaluate the taste in the tasting room. A pleasant bonus: you don’t have to pay for admission.

25 of the world’s strangest museums that are not part of a normal person’s plans (Part 1)

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The 25 strangest museums from around the world, whose visits are not part of a normal person's plans (Part 1)

25 of the world’s strangest museums that are not part of a normal person’s plans (Part 1)

For most people, the word “museum” evokes a very definite association – it is a place where all kinds of curious exhibits are presented: household items, historical documents, technical inventions or works of art. However, there are some museums in the world that do not fit into the big picture. We present the first part of the review of the 25 strangest museums from around the world, the visit of which is not in the plans of a normal person.

25. Beijing Water Museum in Beijing, China

Tap Water Museum in Beijing, China

Tap Water Museum in Beijing, China

The Beijing Tap Water Museum exhibit, consisting of 130 different exhibits, focuses on the history of the development of plumbing in China. The museum also contains antique advertisement posters promoting tap water. The fact is that at the time of the advent of plumbing, the Chinese did not trust this “alien water” and refused to use it. To emphasize the importance and indispensability of water in life, the museum was built on the site of the first water treatment plant in China.

24. Bad Art Museum in Dedham, USA

Bad Art Museum in Dedham, USA

Bad Art Museum in Dedham, USA

The main purpose of the Museum of Bad Art, located in the U.S. state of Massachusetts, is to showcase those works by artists that have not been appreciated in any other museum in the world. Its permanent exhibit includes about 500 works of art “too bad to be ignored,” but due to the limited space, only 30-40 pieces can be shown at a time. Curiously, despite its strange focus, the museum of bad art in Dedham has gained enormous popularity, being mentioned in hundreds of publications around the world.

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23. Dog Collar Museum in Kent, UK

Dog Collar Museum in Kent, UK

Dog Collar Museum in Kent, UK

The original museum, housing a collection of antique dog collars from the 15th to 17th centuries, is located at Leeds Castle in the English county of Kent. In the 15th and 16th centuries, iron collars with sharp spikes were very popular, which protected the throat of dogs in fights with wolves, wild boars and bears. But a century later, the intimidating spiked accessories gave way to fairly modern leather collars. You can trace all this back to one of the collections of the British museum, which gets more than half a million visitors a year.

22. The Lawnmower Museum in Southport, UK

The Lawnmower Museum in Southport, UK

The Lawnmower Museum in Southport, UK

Located in North Merseyside, the museum’s collection consists of over three hundred different pieces of garden tools and machinery ranging from simple trimmers to modern lawnmowers, the oldest of which are over two hundred years old. Among them, for example, you can find the very first lawn mower, the history of which is no less interesting than the exhibit itself. There is also the world’s first solar-powered robotic lawn mower and mechanized lawn care assistants that were given to Princess Diana and Prince Charles.

21. Hair Museum in Avanos, Turkey

Hair Museum in Avanos, Turkey

Hair Museum in Avanos, Turkey

The Hair Museum in Avanos is an incredibly creepy institution located underneath the Gaelip Pottery Store and filled with hair samples from 16,000 women. The walls, ceiling, and surfaces other than the floor are covered with locks of women’s hair and paper slips with the addresses of the women on them. One legend says that the museum was created more than 30 years ago, when Galip’s mistress had to leave Avanos and wished to leave something reminiscent of her. Then she had the idea of cutting off a strand of hair and giving it to the potter. Since then, almost all the women who visited the place have left him some of their hair and their address.

20. Bread Museum in Ulm, Germany

Bread Museum in Ulm, Germany

Bread Museum in Ulm, Germany

The world’s first museum dedicated to bread was opened in one of the former barns of the manufacturer Willi Eislen in the German city of Ulm in 1955. In the museum collection includes more than 18 thousand items, telling about the history of grain growing, the improvement of tools for farmers, millers and bakers, as well as the importance and significance of bread in the history of mankind. The museum has two permanent exhibitions on two floors: “From Grain to Bread” and “Man and Bread”. In addition to the exhibition halls, the structure of the bread museum also includes a special library with 4 thousand books, devoted to the most popular product of the flour.

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19. Salt and pepper shakers museum in Gatlinburg, USA

Salt and pepper shaker museum, Getlinburg, USA

Salt and pepper shaker museum, Getlinburg, USA

This small museum, located in the American state of Tennessee, has become famous all over the world for its enormous exhibition of 22,000 straws and pepper shakers of all shapes and colors. All of this personally belongs to American Andrea Ludden, who has been gathering her collection for more than twenty years. In the museum you can enjoy the unusual exhibition but also buy something to remember it with.

18. Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography Kunstkamera in St. Petersburg, Russia

Kunstkamera Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, St. Petersburg, Russia

Kunstkamera Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, St. Petersburg, Russia

Founded by Emperor Peter the Great, the Kunstkammer in St. Petersburg is considered the first museum of Russia. It houses more than one million objects that were previously used for scientific purposes and now serve as exhibits. Today, the Kunstkammer is exclusively a museum of human mutations and deformities, where visitors can get a firsthand look at the incredible metamorphosis and deviations of human physiology. It is worth noting that in addition to the so-called “freak show”, the Kunstkammer is famous for its numerous exhibits and antiquities, telling about the historical past of many peoples of the world.

17. International Museum of Cryptozoology in Portland, USA

International Museum of Cryptozoology in Portland, USA

International Museum of Cryptozoology in Portland, USA

Cryptozoology is the science that investigates strange, obscure or unknown living creatures. The International Museum dedicated to this science is located in the southeastern United States. Within its walls, visitors can meet near-life Bigfoot Yeti, the Loch Ness Monster, the Jersey Devil, and horned hares roaming the earth or swimming underwater to this day. The museum also contains drawings, sculptures, and the supposed remains of other bizarre creatures that cryptozoologists believe have inhabited planet Earth since prehistoric times. The museum in Portland is incredibly popular with both children who love “monsters” and scientists with a professional interest.

16. The Ando Mamafuku Instant Noodle Museum in Osaka, Japan

Ando Mamafuku instant noodle museum in Osaka, Japan

Ando Mamafuku instant noodle museum in Osaka, Japan

The Momofuku Ando Instant Noodle Museum is located in Osaka Prefecture, Japan. The exhibition of this unusual museum focuses on the history of instant noodles, the biography of their creator Momofuku Ando, and Nissin Foods, a company that produces noodles around the world. There are a lot of interactive exhibits at the exhibition – for example, visitors to the museum can cut noodles from dough, create a noodle glass to your liking, attend a master class on making special noodles and even make their own noodles with any ingredients at the museum’s My Cup Noodle Factory. The museum has its own store, kiosks and a small café overlooking the winter garden.

15. Sirirai Medical Museum (Museum in Death) in Bangkok, Thailand

Sirirai Medical Museum (museum in death) in Bangkok, Thailand

Sirirai Medical Museum (museum in death) in Bangkok, Thailand

The medical museum in Bangkok presents the history of modern medicine in Thailand. All the exhibits are divided into 6 permanent and one temporary exhibition. The exhibit halls include thematic sections such as anatomy, congenital anomalies, pathology, forensic medicine, Thai traditional medicine and toxicology. The Museum of Death contains a huge collection of unique medical cases that can impress not only professionals, but also people far from medicine. Pregnant women, children and highly impressionable persons should not visit this museum, because many exhibits are shocking.

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14. International Clown Hall of Fame in Baraboo, USA

International Clown Hall of Fame in Baraboo, USA

International Clown Hall of Fame in Baraboo, USA

The International Clown Hall of Fame, located in Wisconsin, pays tribute to all members of this adored profession by children and many adults. The museum’s collection features items of clown life, professional paraphernalia, and photo and video footage of the lives of the great masters of the grotesque and buffoonery.

13. Museum of Timeless Beauty in Melaka, Malaysia

Museum of Timeless Beauty in Melaka, Malaysia.

Museum of Timeless Beauty in Melaka, Malaysia.

Most people, especially the beautiful half of humanity, at least occasionally think about eternal youth and beauty. An unusual museum in Malaysia tells about the numerous methods of becoming more beautiful that people have resorted to and are still resorting to throughout history. It features mostly sculptures and graphic images of people who have chosen one or another way to achieve eternal beauty – from the ritual “accessories” of ancient tribes to a variety of cosmetics.

12. Salab International Toilet Museum in New Delhi, India

Salab International Toilet Museum in New Delhi, India.

Salab International Toilet Museum in New Delhi, India.

The Salab Museum of Toilets in New Delhi is a very unusual museum. It was founded by an Indian doctor, Bindestwar Patak, who has devoted his life to recycling waste and producing alternative fuels from excreta. His museum has several thousand exhibits – toilets, urinals, toilet paper, etc. The oldest of them dates back to 3000 BC. It is worth noting that to enhance the effect, some of the halls use special chemicals that convey the “natural aroma” of the toilet. In addition to the seemingly entertaining purpose, the museum also pursues an educational purpose, aimed at a comprehensive improvement of the extremely poor sanitary situation in large Indian cities.

11. the Meguro Museum of Parasitology in Tokyo, Japan

Meguro Museum of Parasitology in Tokyo, Japan

Meguro Museum of Parasitology in Tokyo, Japan

The Museum of Parasitology in Japan’s capital city was founded by Dr. Svturo Kamegai 60 years ago, shortly after the war, when epidemics and diseases were inflicting harm on the Japanese population comparable to the effects of warfare. Today, the Meguro Museum is considered the only museum in the world devoted to the creatures that live inside humans. The museum collection consists of 45,000 parasites. Some of them are displayed “in all their glory” on displays in the two-story exhibition hall. The main and most horrifying exhibit of the museum is considered a 9-meter-long worm that lived in a Japanese girl.

Museums can be very specific and aimed at a very narrow audience, such as the top 10 museums in the world for true geeks and not only for them .

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