“Tender Iris” – walks in Florence, Italy

“Tender Iris” – walks in Florence, Italy

“Tender Iris” was called Florence by Alexander Bloch, who visited here in May 1909. This small city in Tuscany on the Arno River holds amazing treasures of beauty and thought that have literally blossomed here for centuries.

1. Blooming

Wild irises with pale blue petals bloom around Florence in April. At this time, the Romans, who founded a settlement on the banks of the Arno by order of Gaius Julius Caesar in 59 B.C., celebrated the Floraria . The festivities in honor of the goddess Flora coincided with the flowering of irises, so, according to legend, the city was named Firenze, Florence. And the iris became its symbol.

The flowering of Florence as a cultural center falls on the 13th-17th centuries. In 1116 Florence became a commune. European communal cities sought independence and self-government, which had the best effect on their development. In the 13th century Florence introduced its own coin, the gold florin. On one side of the florin was an image of John the Baptist, the city’s patron saint, and on the other was an iris. Florence was famous for its woolen fabrics and was a wealthy city . At the end of the 13th century, construction began on the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, one of Florence’s most famous buildings. The cathedral was built over the course of a hundred years, with interruptions due to plague epidemics. The dome of the cathedral, which is the “trademark” of Florence, was built by the architect and sculptor Filippo Brunelleschi. The recognizable outline of the dome became not only a symbol of the city but also a sign of the new epoch, the Renaissance. Today the cathedral with its adjoining Piazza del Duomo is considered one of the most beautiful places in the world.

1. Blooming

2. The Medici – patrons of the Renaissance

By the early 14th century Florence was made famous by Dante, who elevated the Tuscan dialect to the level of a literary language with his Divine Comedy. But Florence became the true center of the Renaissance during the Medici dynasty. Cosimo de Medici the Elder, who ruled in the first third of the 15th century, became famous as a patron of the arts and philanthropist. He invited painters, sculptors, philosophers and poets, and founded schools and painting studios. His grandson Lorenzo the Magnificent continued his work. With the help of Cosimo de Medici emerged the Academy of Plato – the intellectual center of Europe at the time, a community of people of new views, which would later be called humanism. It is to the Medici that we owe the many masterpieces that were commissioned by them. During the Medici era, a young Leonardo from the town of Vinci appeared in Florence, he worked in the studio of Andrea del Verrocchio and was inspired by the paintings of the masters of the new era, the works of Masaccio, Paolo Uccello, Fra Filippo Lippi and the sculptures of Donatello. He saw buildings built and under construction according to new canons. Besides the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, these were the Medici and Rucellai palaces, the church of Santa Maria Novella, the church of Santissima Annunziata, and the Pitti Palace.

READ
Acre and Eilat - the amazing cities of Israel

2. The Medici – patrons of the Renaissance

Today we can visit the Palazzo Medici Riccardo in Via Cavour. The external restraint of the house is due to Cosimo’s desire not to arouse the envy of the other patrician families of Florence. But the interior rooms hold such treasures of painting as the Chapel of the Magi. In the center of the chapel is an altarpiece depicting the Nativity by Filippo Lippi. The walls of the chapel are covered with continuous fresco paintings by Benozzo Gozzoli. We see the Magi walking in procession following the Star of Bethlehem. In the images of the Magi and the attendants, a portrait resemblance to members of the Medici family and their contemporaries can be discerned, and the terrain in which they walk recalls the landscapes in the suburbs of Florence.

3. The Gardens of Florence.

In addition to its palazzos, churches, and cathedrals, Florence is famous for its gardens. Oddly enough, the Iris Garden is one of the youngest among Florence’s gardens. It was created in 1954. Soft pink, pale yellow, purple, purple – the variety of colors is striking, but blooms last only a month, from April to early May. The garden is cared for by the Florence Iris Society. Near the church of San Miñato is a small but no less striking Garden of Roses. Since 1895 it has been open to the public from May 1 until the end of July. Roses of all varieties and shades bloom serenely here, surrounded by sculptures and fountains. The garden, located on a hill, offers a beautiful view of the city. Not far from the Arno, you’ll find the ancient Bardini Garden, where fruit and vegetables were grown until the 16th century. Later this place was turned into a garden decorated with fountains, sculptures, baroque staircase and grottos. Another famous garden is the Boboli Garden, founded during the Medici era. It is also famous for the fact that its amphitheater was the stage for the first opera productions .

READ
The best places to see the Northern Lights in Norway

3. The Gardens of Florence.

4. Ponte Vecchio

One of Florence’s most recognizable places is the Ponte Vecchio arch bridge. The oldest bridge over the Arno appeared in Roman times, was rebuilt in 1345 and saved its shape to this day. It became famous thanks to G. Puccini’s opera “Gianni Schicchi”, where it is mentioned in the famous aria of Lauretta “O mio babbino caro”. It was from this bridge that Lauretta, in case she was not allowed to marry her beloved, was going to throw herself into the river.

The bridge was the center of commerce, butchers’ shops were located here until the 16th century, later replaced by jewelers’ workshops. So now Ponte Vecchio is also known as the Golden Bridge. In 1944 the German troops leaving the city blew up all the bridges except Ponte Vecchio. According to legend, it was saved by the Resistance fighters.

4. Ponte Vecchio

5. Uffizi

Crossing the Arno over the Ponte Vecchio bridge leads to one of the most famous museums in the world, the Uffizi. Its name can be translated as “offices”. , the building once housed the offices of the craft shops.

5. Uffizi

The foundation of the museum’s collection was laid over five hundred years ago by Francesco I de’ Medici . In the halls of the Uffizi you can see masterpieces by Giotto, Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Caravaggio, as well as examine the collection of ancient Roman sculptures.

The Iris Garden in Florence.

Florence, thou gentle iris; For whom have I languished alone With a long, hopeless love, All day in thy dust Kashin?

Oh, sweet to remember the hopelessness: To dream and live in thy wilderness; To retreat into thy ancient heat and the tenderness of my aging soul.

But we are destined to part, And through distant lands Thy smoky iris will be dreamed, Like my early youth.

READ
12 places to see in Gran Canaria, Africa

It is not without reason that the poet compared the city to the iris; this flower is symbolic for Florence. One might think that the city’s coat of arms depicts a heraldic lily. No, it’s an iris.

The red iris (which does not exist in nature) appeared on Florence’s coat of arms after the Ghibellines (who had the opposite image on their coat of arms: white iris on a red background) were expelled from the city by the Guelphs during the Middle Ages.

A medieval-style feast in Florence.

Since then, the Italian Iris Society has held an international competition every year with the goal of obtaining a variety of Iris that has the scarlet color represented on Florence’s coat of arms. If there are any floriculture experts among your readers, you may dare to participate!

The garden itself is not as beautiful as the Garden of Roses. The irises grow on a small hill in the shade of olives. But what irises! Eh, too bad it was drizzling with a little rain, the sun was gone, and the camera is far from perfect. But I hope you will still feel sympathy for this garden.

I wanted to sing, “there’s a black pond in Earl’s Park, where the lilies bloom. “

Iris Garden admission is free from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Please note the break!

The garden is only open to visitors in May when around 2,500 species of irises are in bloom. There you can buy the tubers of your favorite species.

Rating
( No ratings yet )
Like this post? Please share to your friends:
bucketlisttc.com
Leave a Reply

;-) :| :x :twisted: :smile: :shock: :sad: :roll: :razz: :oops: :o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :grin: :evil: :cry: :cool: :arrow: :???: :?: :!: