Top 10 ways to experience Marrakech. Morocco

Marrakech for the first time: what to know and see

What to see in Marrakech

Travel tips

Marrakech is a major city in Morocco, the most important of the four imperial cities, and as a major tourist destination is likely to be your first impression of Morocco. Marrakech is now a far cry from the hippie mecca of the 1960s, but it still charms and offers some of the best travel experiences in Morocco. The tourism industry here is quite developed and affordable for the budget tourist. Known as the Red City of Morocco for its pink and ochre fortress walls, Marrakech is equally alluring, energetic, colorful and stunning. Here’s a list of things to do in Marrakech, Morocco.

What to see in Marrakech?

To enjoy Marrakech to the maximum, we recommend spending at least three to four days here before heading to other cities. Marrakech has a dry and sunny climate, close to the desert and the Atlas Mountains. In addition, Marrakech is very easy to get to from European capitals, there is a new airport. Several highways link Marrakech with Casablanca, Fez and Essaouira, making it easily accessible.

To get your bearings in Marrakech, it is worth taking a local tour. Marrakech is a bustling city with heavy traffic, so it is easy to get lost here. A guided tour with a transfer from your hotel will give you a good idea of the main sights and how to navigate the medina.

Link to the tours!

Jamaa El Fna

Jamaa El Fna is a large square on the outskirts of the medina and the cultural heart of Marrakech. When you emerge from the narrow, covered alleyways, Jamaa el-Fna appears as a grand and lively central square. Around 1050 A.D. public executions were held there and the name means “Gathering of the Dead”. Since then, everything has been going on at Jamaa el-Fna: street theater, gnawa musicians, snake charmers, and food vendors will entertain and perhaps overwhelm you. Up until the 1980s, Jamaa el-Fna was home to a bus station where travelers came and went at all hours of the day. After the bus station closed, the square became quieter and more organized.

In 2001, Jamaa el-Fna was named a UNESCO World Heritage Masterpiece. It paints a complete picture of Moroccan life and culture: you can see street theater and Gnawa musicians in their colorful costumes. Water vendors in fringed hats attract attention with their colorful clothing and brassware. These days they are more fond of being photographed and ask for a small fee, but if you manage to get a good picture, it will be a vivid illustration of modern Moroccan life. Gnawa musicians and snake charmers will do the same, and quite insistently.

Jamaa el Fna is a must-see in Marrakech, but it is also a prime spot for all kinds of crooks and pickpockets, so you need to be very careful when walking here.

A quieter way to enjoy the activities on Jamaa el-Fna is from above. There are many rooftop restaurants with great views, we recommend having a drink or dinner while watching the night gradually cover the square.

Medina

The medina, also known as the Suok, is a maze of narrow streets and small squares filled with stalls and stores selling all kinds of goods.

The medina is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In our opinion, Marrakech has the most vibrant, colorful and rich markets. The size and number of goods is incredible, the market is a fantastic showcase of all Moroccan craftsmanship.

Although the medina of Marrakech is very touristy, it is also a place of work and real life. Amidst the bright colors of tourist goods, the medina is full of locals going about their business, buying groceries, carrying goods, and trading.

As you enter the medina and walk through the narrow alleys, you may get scared and expect to get lost at some point… Don’t worry, that’s part of the experience, you can discover some great places as you walk. If you use a local SIM card, Google maps and a map of the city will help.

However, if you need advice from a local, it’s best to go into a store and ask someone. We don’t recommend trusting random people on the street too much, they may want to act as a guide for a while and steer you in the wrong direction. If you are staying in Marrakech for a few days, staying within the medina can be a great way to get your bearings.

Majorelle Garden.

The Majorelle Garden is one of the most visited places in Morocco and the main attraction in Marrakech. Located in the “new town” (ville nouvelle) and created by the French orientalist artist Jacques Majorelle, it is a charming garden in the heart of Marrakech. Jacques lived here from 1923 to the 1950s and created a beautiful botanical garden full of trees, exotic plants, bubbling streams and pools filled with water lilies and lotus flowers.

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At Majorelle’s request, French architect Paul Sinoir built a Cubist-style villa here in the 1930s. In the 1980s, the villa and garden were bought by the fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent and his partner Pierre Bergé. The place, which had fallen into disrepair, was completely restored.

Saint Laurent discovered Marrakech in the 1960s, when it became a “hippie mecca.” It became Saint Laurent’s main place of work and inspiration, and after his death in 2008, his ashes were scattered in the garden. Today, the Majorelle Garden is an unrivaled landmark in Marrakech. This garden is a true bird’s paradise, and the combination of colors adorning the buildings makes for stunning photos.

There is a café, the Berber Museum and the Yves Saint Laurent memorial. The museum’s bookstore has very good books, and the Majorelle boutique has beautiful (and expensive) pieces that feel inspired by Saint Laurent.

The Majorelle Garden is beautiful and inspiring, but it is also a victim of its success, it is completely crowded with tourist buses and it is quite difficult to take photos without strangers. The entrance fee is 70 dirhams per adult, it’s not cheap, and it can get pretty crowded.

A visit to the Saint Laurent Museum is something to do in Marrakech Morocco

Yves Saint Laurent Museum

The Yves Saint Laurent Museum is on the street that bears his name. On an area of 400 square meters, the museum displays 5,000 pieces of clothing, 15,000 accessories, thousands of sketches and documents created and stored over four decades. There is also a temporary exhibition space, a photo gallery and a white-themed cafe, “Le Studio,” named after and inspired by Saint Laurent’s Paris atelier.

Ben Youssef Madrassa

The Ben Youssef Madrasah, located in the heart of the medina, is an Islamic college founded in the 14th century. The largest Muslim madrasa in Morocco, and for a time it was one of the largest theological colleges in North Africa. The madrasa is a fine example of Islamic architecture, with many beautiful design details such as zellige, stucco, mosaics, and cedar carvings!

Opened as a museum in 1960, the madrasa was carefully restored in 1999 and abounds with incredibly fine details.

Other attractions in Marrakech

Qutubiya Mosque

The Koutoubia, the largest mosque in Marrakech, built in the 12th century in red stone and brick, is 80 meters high. It is forbidden for non-believers to enter mosques in Morocco, but you should not miss the opportunity to admire the Koutoubia outside, especially at dusk.

Bahia Palace

The Bahia Palace is a 19th century palace built in the Islamic style, with beautiful architecture. Decorated by the best craftsmen of the time, the palace includes a mosque, Koranic school, harem, hammam, stables, various gardens and vegetable gardens. During the French protectorate, General Lauti established his headquarters here and had electricity and running water installed. Bahia Palace is now a museum and another fine example of Islamic architecture.

Menard Gardens

The Menard Gardens are a botanical garden west of Marrakech, built in the 12th century. The pavilion overlooking the pool was built in the 16th century, under the Saadi dynasty, and is in line with the Koutoubia mosque. An old hydraulic system brings water from the mountains, and the gardens contain olive groves and fruit trees. The place is a bit dilapidated these days, but the pavilion presents a beautiful view with the Atlas Mountains in the background. This sight is most often seen in winter when the air is clear.

Saad Tomb.

This is a 16th century mausoleum dedicated to the Saadian sultans. It was lost for many years and was rediscovered by the French in 1917 thanks to aerial photography. Islamic architecture abounds: floral motifs, calligraphy, Carrara marble zellig and cedar wood carvings.

Guéliz

Guéliz is a colonial neighborhood in the “New Village.” Built by the French, Guéliz has a 1930s atmosphere with several Art Deco buildings and leafy streets. This neighborhood is a quieter option for living. The best clothes and leather are in Guéliz, check out the stores on Rue de la Liberté:

  • Intensité Nomade.
  • Place Vendome
  • Galerie Birkemeyer.

Religion

Islam is the official state religion of Morocco, you will hear the call to prayer around the city 5 times a day, and generally non-Muslims are not allowed in mosques. Friday is a Muslim prayer day, so some businesses and restaurants may be closed.

Don’t get lost!

The Medina of Marrakech has narrow, winding streets and few signposts, so the likelihood of getting lost at some point is quite high. The paper maps provided at the hotel give you away immediately as a tourist, so your best bet is to download an offline map via Google maps. Beware of unsolicited advice on how to get around (see “Fraud” section above), if you need to ask for directions, it’s best to ask a vendor or restaurant employee.

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Photography in Marrakech

The sights and colors of Marrakech can be irresistible to photographers, but before you start clicking nonstop, keep in mind that many people in Marrakech do not want their pictures taken or their goods photographed. In fact, I’ve seen several signs in bazaars asking people not to take pictures. The key is to ask permission to take pictures and be respectful if the answer is no.

Food in Marrakech.

A trip to Morocco would not be considered complete without getting to know the local cuisine. Moroccan food is a subtle blend of sweet and savory, always prepared with care and understanding of the time. Cuisine in Morocco is all about aromas of mint, cumin, orange blossom, rose, and cinnamon.

In small towns or other tourist towns, less famous than Marrakech, the dishes you will find on the menu are usually pretty standard. Varieties of stews, such as “Tajin” (a dish of stewed meat with vegetables) with lemon chicken and vegetable couscous, predominate, and the presentation of the dishes may not always be good.

There are varying reviews of the food on the Internet, because the city’s status as a major tourist destination makes it vulnerable to negligent service in establishments. Fortunately, Marrakech has plenty to choose from, from street food to fine dining.

What to try in Marrakech/Morocco?

If this is your first time in Marrakech, you should look out for dishes like:

  • tagine (stew)
  • couscous
  • marshmallow
  • harira soup
  • meze
  • briyats
  • sweets and confectionery

Marrakech has a huge number of restaurants, both on the streets and on the rooftops. The rooftops are especially good for a relaxing drink while admiring the skyline and the Atlas Mountains.

Do you want to learn about Moroccan cuisine? You can attend a 4-hour cooking class in the beautiful setting of an authentic riad and learn how to make a traditional Moroccan tagine. Check the link for more information and current tour prices.

Peppermint tea in Morocco.

Whether served as a greeting, drunk during a business deal, or enjoyed as a way to relax in the afternoon, mint tea is central to life in Marrakech. The mixture of green tea and fresh mint is traditionally served very sweet.

Alcohol in Marrakech

Alcohol is not common, although wine, beer and cocktails (often overpriced) can be found in restaurants and hotels serving tourists. Surprisingly, there are even a few Moroccan vineyards producing Spanish-style wines. Do not get drunk and appear in public places, such behavior is highly frowned upon.

Safety in Marrakech

As a major tourist center, Marrakech attracts all kinds of fake guides, traders and crooks. So you have to be careful and avoid unpleasant situations.

What to watch out for

  • The most unpleasant part of your first stay in Marrakech will be the sticklers and helpers. People will come up to you to be a guide or to sell you something;
  • In cabs there are, always negotiate the cost in advance. Many have disabled meters, so drivers prefer to charge a flat fee, sometimes calling a very large amount;
  • Sellers can be pushy, insisting that you buy items in large quantities;
  • Photography is often a subject of conflict. Random residents you have photographed will demand payment, sometimes very insistently. You need to keep a sense of humor. That’s the best way to handle it.

Scammers

Fraud is an unfortunate part of life in the Medina, often in the form of unsolicited help with directions, telling tourists that the street they are on is closed, or “tannery tours,” all of which will then demand payment for their services.

In general, Marrakech is quite safe for tourists, even for single women. Moroccans understand the word “no,” and one must be firm but always polite.

Clothing for women.

Morocco is a Muslim country, women are advised to dress conservatively. Your knees and shoulders should be covered. Wear loose T-shirts and light pants or long skirts, and a stole or scarf to cover yourself if it gets chilly at night and from the sun during the day. Closed-toe shoes are also a good recommendation to avoid stepping in “footprints” from donkeys and other animals in the medina.

Best time to go.

Marrakech has a hot and semi-arid climate, and summers can be unbearable. We recommend avoiding July and August because of the heat and the large number of tourists.

In winter it can be cold, especially at night. However, when the air is clear, the Atlas Mountains are very visible. Autumn can be humid, especially in October and November.

The best time to visit Marrakech is in spring, from March to May, before it gets too hot.

You just need to adapt to the weather conditions and pack properly, then your stay will be comfortable in any season.

To sum up

Marrakech is a must-see in Morocco and will likely be your starting point, but it’s also a great gateway to many other places like Tangier or Chefchaouen. If you want to explore more of this beautiful country, I have some great tips for driving in Morocco. Some roads are dangerous, but also incredibly beautiful. If you are traveling through northern Morocco, I also recommend visiting Tetouan and the Spanish enclaves and learning about the controversial Spanish islands.

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MARRAKESH

Marrakech, the oldest of the four imperial cities of Morocco, was founded in 1062 and for a century was the capital of the Berber dynasty of the Almoravids, and after it – the Almohads. Historically it was inhabited by Berbers, so Marrakech is often called the “Berber” capital of the country, as well as the “red city” because all the houses in it are painted in ochre. Marrakech is the most visited tourist city in Morocco and the main center of nightlife in the country. It is warm and sunny, even in winter, and a medieval medina with palaces, madrassas and mosques attracts its color. Many travelers do not like the atmosphere of mass tourism in Marrakech. Others, on the contrary, like the huge selection of hotels, restaurants, and entertainment. To enjoy Marrakech, you need a good budget for the beautiful riad, restaurants and nightlife, boutiques and entertainment. You may need a good guide to visit all the secret spots of the medina. In any case, you should spend at least a day in this city to immerse yourself in the madness of the crowded bazaars and Jemaa el-Fna Square, explore the beautiful architectural monuments and taste the specialties of local cuisine.

Marrakech, the oldest of the four imperial cities of Morocco, was founded in 1062 and for a century was the capital of the Berber dynasty of the Almoravids, and after it – the Almohads. Historically it was inhabited by Berbers, so Marrakech is often called the “Berber” capital of the country, as well as the “red city” because all the houses in it are painted in ochre. Marrakech is the most visited tourist city in Morocco and the main center of nightlife in the country. It is warm and sunny, even in winter, and a medieval medina with palaces, madrassas and mosques attracts its color. Many travelers do not like the atmosphere of mass tourism in Marrakech. Others, on the contrary, like the huge selection of hotels, restaurants, and entertainment. To enjoy Marrakech, you need a good budget for the beautiful riad, restaurants and nightlife, boutiques and entertainment. You may need a good guide to visit all the secret spots of the medina. In any case, you should spend at least a day in this city to immerse yourself in the madness of the crowded bazaars and Jemaa el-Fna Square, explore the beautiful architectural monuments and taste the specialties of local cuisine.

The Red City enjoys year-round sunshine and a light rainfall only from October-November to March-April. The best seasons to explore Marrakech are February-May and October-November, when the weather is mildest.

The Red City enjoys year-round sunshine and a light rainfall only from October-November to March-April. The best seasons to explore Marrakech are February-May and October-November, when the weather is mildest.

– Low season; – 13-18 degrees during the day, 5-10 at night. The rains happen; – Avoid the period of Christmas and New Year holidays (no hotel rooms, everything is expensive); – In winter it gets dark early and cold; – Choose a hotel with heating; – Great views of the snow-capped Atlas Mountains; – Not the best time for excursions to the mountains. It is cold there (+5-10 degrees) and it can rain.

– High season; – best time to go; – 15-30 degrees by day, 10-20 degrees at night. It may rain until mid-April; – Lots of greenery and flowers, snow in the mountains until April; – Avoid Catholic Easter week, when there are too many tourists; – From April 12 to May 11, 2021 – Ramadan fasting time

– the heat is 35-45 degrees, sometimes up to 50 degrees; – choose a hotel with a large area and a swimming pool; – it is better to take excursions half a day, before dinner; – July 19, 2021 – the festival of sacrifice, life freezes for a few days

– high season; – perfect weather, but no greenery in the landscapes, and snow in the mountains; – 15-30 degrees during the day, 10-20 at night. Rains are possible from mid-October; – Great time for trips to the mountains.

It will take 1 day to see the main sights of Marrakech. However, we recommend planning at least 2 days to enjoy the bazaars, the nightlife and the less touristy parts of the city.

It will take 1 day to see the main sights of Marrakech. However, we recommend planning at least 2 days to enjoy the bazaars, the nightlife and the less touristy parts of the city.

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10 Ways to Spend an Interesting Time in the Red City

What things to do in Marrakech?

10 Ways to Spend an Interesting Time in the Red City

Marrakech is the best city in Morocco for discovering traditional Moroccan cuisine. Try the folk delicacies in and around Jemaa el-Fna Square. The local specialty is tangia (meat with spices baked over a slow fire in a jug). You can taste the real gourmet cuisine in the expensive restaurants: Al Fassia, Dar Marjana, La Maison Arabe, Dar Moha and others.

Enjoy the bright colors of African sunset over the old city with the silhouette of Kutubiya minaret on the horizon. The cafes with the best view can be found around Djemaa el Fna Square.

The town’s main square must be visited at least twice. By day one sees snake charmers, water peddlers in wide-brimmed hats, and colorful orange juice and dried fruit vendors. At night you can sample all the Moroccan delicacies in a huge street restaurant and watch street artists, musicians, storytellers and acrobats perform.

You can just watch him work or take a real master class in zellig mosaic making, pottery, woodcarving, calligraphy and much more.

Here you can learn about the secrets of traditional medicines and cosmetics, buy magic potions and Berber Viagra. It takes hours to figure out what each of the jars and herbs is for. Ask the seller what the dried skins of chameleons and snakes are used for, and you’ll learn a lot about Moroccan culture! Learn more about Berber pharmacies in our article, Berber Pharmacies of Morocco.

Discover talented local artists and shop for boho-inspired furnishings and accessories that’ll keep you warm on long winter evenings.

Learn the rules of haggling in Morocco and hone your skills at the rug or babouche market. Our article “Shopping and the rules of bargaining in Morocco” will help you do that.

Learn how to make Moroccan tagine or couscous at one of the cooking schools in Marrakech. No, it’s not just for women! A master class in Moroccan gastronomy is a whole cultural excursion that will be of interest to absolutely everyone.

Learn all about Moroccan cuisine on our Gastronomic Tours in Morocco page.

Indulge in Moroccan rituals of beauty and well-being. In Morocco’s tourist capital, you’ll find hammams to suit all tastes, from folk to luxury. Check out Marrakech’s best spa offerings here.

Marrakech is famous not only for its traditional culture, but also for its luxurious parties, clubs and bars. Go to dinner with a show of oriental dancers, gnaoua musicians and fakirs and dance till morning to a fiery live band or DJ at the best disco in the city.

Best half-day or full-day excursion ideas

Excursions from Marrakech

Air

Marrakech has its own international airport, which is only a 10-minute drive from the city center. But you can fly to it from Russia only with a change of plane in Europe. The most convenient way from Moscow is to fly to Casablanca by direct flight of Royal Air Maroc, and then book a transfer to Marrakech. It will save you from agonizing waiting in the uncomfortable transit area of Casablanca airport, and also protect you from the risk of delay or cancellation of your domestic flight. The journey from Casablanca airport to Marrakech takes only 2.5 hours on a good expressway.

By train

The train is a convenient means of getting around Morocco for independent travelers who do not drive. The railroad links Marrakech with Casablanca (2 h 40 min, from Dh120), Rabat (3.5 h, from Dh 150), Tangier (5.5 h, from Dh 330 by high-speed train), Fez (6.5 h, from Dh 315). Trains run approximately every 2 hours. Ticket prices vary slightly depending on departure time, day of the week and return conditions. It makes sense to take a first class ticket (for about 30% extra), which is much more spacious and has better air conditioning. From Casablanca airport to Marrakech, you have to change trains in the center of Casablanca. Travelling by train is not very convenient because the platforms at Moroccan stations are low, and it is difficult to get the suitcases in the car. Trains are often late, and there may be no seats available in second class. Check the Moroccan railroad website for timetables and rail fares: www.oncf-voyages.ma (in French).

By bus

Bus routes connect Marrakech with cities that are not served by rail. The best bus companies in Morocco are CTM (see the schedule and buy tickets at www.ctm.ma) and a subsidiary of the Moroccan railroads Supratours (see the schedule and buy tickets at www.oncf-voyages.ma).

The most popular routes and prices for CTM/Supratours tickets are: 1) Marrakech-Essuveira: 3h, from 90 USD 2) Marrakech-Agadir: 3h, from 120 USD 3) Marrakech-Ouarzazate: 4.5h, from 100 USD 4) Marrakech-Merzouga: 12h, from 250 USD Buses stop for toilets and snacks and may be very late.

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By car.

A good toll highway connects Marrakech with Essouira (2.5h), Casablanca (2.5h), Rabat (3.5h), Tangier (6h), Fez (5.5h). If you have time, you should drive from Fez to Marrakech (or vice versa) via Ifrane, Azrou and Beni Mellal to enjoy the beautiful mountain scenery, Berber villages and maybe visit the Ouzoud waterfall on the way. It takes 8,5-10 hours. The drive from Marrakech to Ouarzazate takes about 4 hours and goes over the high mountain pass of Tizi-n-Tishka at 2260m. It snows in winter and you must drive with extreme caution.

Where to stay in Marrakech?

Hotels in Marrakech

If you want to be in the middle of the action, choose hotels in the districts of Yvernage and Gueliz, or the slightly more remote Agdal district. Here are all the most popular restaurants, bars, discos, casinos and boutiques within walking distance. You can also walk to Djemaa el-Fna Square and the old medina. We recommend the following hotels in the city center with excellent value for money:

  • 3* hotels: Racine 3*, Red 3*, Blue Sea Le Printemps 3*, El Andalous 3*+
  • 4* hotels: Opera Plaza 4*, Bab Hotel 4*, 2 Ciels 4*, Es Saadi Hotel 4*+
  • 5* hotels: Hivernage 5*, Le Savoy 5*, Radisson 5*, Kenzi Menara Palace 5*, Kenzi Club Agdal Medina 5*
  • 5* luxury hotels: Four Seasons 5*L, La Mamounia 5*L, Royal Mansour 5*L

Booking a hotel in Morocco on your own, remember that its star rating on the Internet can be very relative. “Five” with a loud name may in reality be an old “three”. So always read carefully the reviews, or contact a professional travel agent.

Riads of Marrakech

The choice of riads (traditional guesthouses) in the tourist capital of Morocco is truly enormous. Online reservation systems offer hundreds of riads for all tastes and budgets. Staying in a riad is worth it if you want to immerse yourself in the atmosphere of homey Moroccan hospitality. In doing so, you will probably have to sacrifice some privacy and comfort. Riad rooms are often small in size and overlook the courtyard. This means they lack daylight, and hearing in the rooms will be very good. However, with careful selection of riad these disadvantages can be avoided. It is best to book a riad within a 10-minute walk of Jemaa el-Fna Square and in the prestigious Dar al-Basha medina quarter, where there are many boutiques, art galleries, cafes, restaurants and hammams. Keep in mind that riads are often located in narrow alleyways and need to be walked from the main street with all your luggage.

Riads, except for the most luxurious ones, do not officially have a star rating. They can be roughly divided into economy, mid-price, and luxury categories.

Staying in a riad will not be very convenient for nightlife lovers, because it can be very difficult to find a riad on your own in the corners of the medina late at night!

Villas in Marrakech

The option of renting a villa is perfect for private events and for a group of friends or a big family holiday. The villa staff will prepare meals for you and clean the rooms. However, booking villas comes with a lot of risk. You will not be able to check the reviews of the villa in advance, and beautiful photos do not guarantee a good condition of the villa in reality. Trust only serious agencies with a good reputation. Such agencies tend to rent villas only in the premium and luxury category. By independently looking for a budget option on the internet, you run the risk of running into crooks.

Guest houses in the mountains near Marrakech

Nature lovers, silence and starry skies may like the idea of staying in a guesthouse or boutique hotel in the mountains near Marrakech – in the Urika or Wirgan Valley. This is an ideal base for hiking in the mountains and experiencing the local Berber culture. Each of these guesthouses will offer you different walks, from the easiest to the most challenging, accompanied by a local English-speaking guide. Regardless of the price range of these guesthouses, they are all very colorful and authentic.

Among the budget and medium-price options we can recommend Ksar Shama, Chez Momo, and among the luxury ones – Kasbah Angour, Kasbah Bab Ourika, Kasbah Tamadot (hotel Richard Branson).

If you don’t have time to travel to the real Sahara Desert, we recommend you spend the night in a campsite in the Agafay Desert, a 40-minute drive from Marrakech. You can go quad biking or camel riding, watch the sunset over beautiful stony dunes, dine by starlight and moonlight and spend the night in a luxury tent in the absolute silence of the desert.

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