The difference between the Moscow and London Underground: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground

The difference between the Moscow and London Underground: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground

The subway is the most common mode of transport in metropolitan areas, because it is easier and faster to get to the right place, for example, to work. By bus or car, there is a risk of getting caught in traffic and being late. The subway moves freely, trains never stop and come at short intervals. The main thing – know the subway scheme and know the stations and signs. For an inexperienced person it will be very difficult, especially if he comes from a city where there is no subway.

Moscow and London are capitals of two countries, Russia and Great Britain. Both cities can be called not just large, but huge, because they are not just more than a million people, but several million (in London, more than eight, and in Moscow about twelve or fourteen). It is clear that with such a flow of passengers, the subway is simply vital.

Subway is not the same as subway: main differences between Moscow and London subway - Photo 2

The difference between the Moscow and London Underground: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground

To compare underground transport in both cities, we must look at it more closely :

Rush hour . It’s the “hottest” time, that is, people go first to work and then from work. Approximately it’s from about eight to nine in the morning and from five to seven in the evening, plus or minus half an hour in each direction. At the same time, if you observe the Moscow metro, it’s literally crammed: people are cramming, pushing and scandalizing, and as for the train, it constantly bursts from the overload, because because the crowd of people who want to get in it can’t close the doors. In London everything is much calmer, although in terms of geometry the length of the subway is about the same. Just quite a lot of residents of the capital of Great Britain prefer to go by cab or private car. Yes, there are traffic jams, but here they don’t compare with Russian ones. For the British, five or ten minutes of waiting is already a long time, while Muscovites stand quietly for two or three hours and are even used to this state of affairs.

Trains. The London Underground is older, hence the transport here is noticeably different from that in Moscow. In Moscow, there are a lot of new things, especially when new stations open. People who come to England are surprised at how “old” the subway is, and the stations are not always up-to-date. The cars are made in the style of the 50-60s, but it does not spoil the overall picture. On the contrary, guests of Foggy Albion are delighted that they could get into the “retro-metro”.

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Metro to Metro: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground - Photo 3

The difference between the Moscow and London Underground: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground

People’s behavior . It can be argued, of course, but the manners of some Russian passengers speak for themselves. Of course, both in Moscow and London there are quite a lot of newcomers and immigrants, so, alas, no one is immune from rudeness. But it is still worth paying attention to the mentality: the English are more polite and well-mannered. They behave very discreetly even if the carriage is full of people: they read books or newspapers, listen to music, talk softly with friends or relatives who are traveling with them. In the Moscow subway, it is sometimes impossible to be away from squabbles, yelling, laughing, talking on the phone throughout the car, as well as from the loud speakerphone or deliberately turned on music. Just as in the 1980s young people used to walk down the street with a tape recorder, now the same trick is done with a cell phone.

Otherwise, the two subways are identical: card payment at the entrance, station names. However, there are always advertisements pasted on the wall in the London underpass: a famous band performs, a movie premiere, or something else. Moscow is much more modest in this sense: there almost all the passages are pristinely clean. The most important thing to remember for visitors of both cities is to try to take the metro with someone who is more or less familiar with it. If people are used to getting around on foot or by car, in the subway they can get elementarily confused .

The difference between the Moscow and London Underground: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground - photo 4

The difference between the Moscow and London Underground: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground

The difference between the Moscow and London Underground: the main differences between the Moscow and London Underground

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Perhaps the most popular historical parallel, which is cited to and fro, is that in the early 1860s London had a subway and Russia abolished serfdom. That’s true, but it’s not so simple, really, of course. But today we will not go into historical perspective, and simply congratulate the London Underground, aka “pipe” with the 150th anniversary! Google joins in :)

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Here – an excellent text about the history of the subway and interesting facts about it, and I decided to compare the two subways – the London and Moscow. I have no particular love or hatred for either, they have both pluses and minuses, and a lot of interesting things in both. Here I started thinking and a whole table appeared. I’m sure you’ll have something to add to it and comment on it. So go for it!

Founded in 1863

Founded in 1935.

Carries 1.1 billion passengers a year.

Carries 2.4 billion passengers a year.

11 lines, 270 stations, 402 kilometers of tracks

12 lines, 188 stations, 313 kilometers of tracks

Fare depends on zones, inside the first (central) zone – 4.2 pounds for a paper ticket and 2.1 pounds for a smart card (1 pound = 50 rubles). Fares are increased annually.

The fare is the same throughout the metro network, there are no zones, the price per trip is 28 rubles. Fares are increased regularly, but in 2013 did not change in comparison with 2012

There is a daily limit, over which the fee is not charged, it is about three to four trips, all that above – free.

Each trip is paid for, regardless of the number of trips per day

Most tickets are sold through vending machines and can be automatically recharged at the turnstiles

The vast majority of tickets are sold at the ticket office

The main method of payment is the universal reusable Oyster smart card, valid for all modes of urban transport, paper tickets remain, but their share is increasingly smaller and their fare more expensive

Smart cards for long-term use do exist, but paper magnetic tickets for a certain number of trips take up a significant share of the total number of tickets.

Metro hours are 5:30 a.m. to 1 a.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 12 a.m.

Metro hours are from 5:30 am to 1 am.

On weekends, many line sections are closed for maintenance work alternately.

Closing the subway for repair work during normal hours is an extraordinary and very rarely used measure.

Intervals between trains 2-3 minutes, but may be up to 8-10 minutes

Intervals between trains are usually 1-2 minutes, 4-5 minutes is almost an emergency

The boards in the stations show time to the next trains

The boards in the stations show the time after the previous train, and only on the Filyovskaya line fork – the time to the next trains

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More than a half (55%) of the metro is located on the ground, in open sections

Open sections can be counted on the fingers, there are 10 stations on the surface

Subway turnstiles of “permit” type (doors open when a fare is put in/out)

Subway turnstiles of the “prohibitive” type (doors open, but close if an incorrect/unpaid pass is taken) are gradually being replaced by “permit” type turnstiles

Tickets must be validated/rolled not only at the entrance, but also at the exit.

Tickets must be valid only at the entrance.

No cell phone service at underground stations and stations

In underground sections and stations, cell phone service does not just work, you can often catch the signal of several operators.

Since the summer of 2012, there is Wi-Fi, which was free for everyone, and from the beginning of this year it will remain free for users of some mobile networks

Free Wi-Fi is formally available on the Circle Line, but unstable

On the escalators in the subway, they stand on the right and pass on the left

On the escalators in the subway, they stand on the right and pass on the left

The Circle Line is yellow on the map

The circular line on the map is brown

The color of subway handrails often matches the color of the line

Subway handrails are in steel

Almost every subway line has its own type of carriages

For many years, metro cars were the same for all lines, now there are their own modifications for different lines

The problem of ventilation in the subway and especially in the trains is one of the key, the trains with air conditioning have just been introduced

The problem of ventilation in the subway and especially in trains is one of the key problems, trains with conditioners are introduced several years ago

There are no specially designed “theme” trains, the maximum is a Poppy on Memorial Day.

There are specially designed cars – “Red Arrow”, “Watercolor”, “Retro”, etc.

In addition to the subway, there is the DLR light rail and Overground

In addition to the subway there is the light rail.

In the subway cars, people often crowd at the doors, despite calls for them to go inside the car.

In the subway cars, people often crowd at the doors, despite calls for them to go inside the car.

It’s not common in the subway to ask if they’re getting off “on the next” (excessive communication and invasion of privacy), but when the train stops, passengers begin to frantically push for the exit

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One of the most popular questions is, “On the next exit? In especially crowded carriages you sometimes hear: “One way out?”. Those who get up late and start making their way to the exit are looked upon with disapproval at best.

There are a lot of handrails in the cars, no “dead zones”, nothing to hold on to

There are “dead zones” in the carriages where you can’t reach any of the handrails and there’s nothing to lean on.

The London Underground can take you to two city airports

You can’t get to the airports on the Moscow metro.

People read a lot in the subway cars, it is customary to leave newspapers for the next passenger, and picking up other people’s newspapers is not considered shameful

People read a lot in the subway cars; it’s not customary to leave newspapers behind

Women in the subway often wear makeup and makeup themselves.

It’s not accepted in the subway to paint yourself; if you paint yourself on the subway, you’ll not only get a disapproving look, but also a warning.

People occasionally eat in the subway, spreading the smell of fast food all around

People hardly ever eat in the subway, mostly for hygiene reasons.

It is forbidden to drink alcohol in the metro and it is periodically broken

It is forbidden to drink alcohol in the metro, but it is often broken

There is no smoking on the metro

There is no smoking on the metro

The subway is poorly adapted for people with disabilities, but new stations are built with this in mind and older stations are renovated, but very slowly

The subway is poorly adapted for disabled people, but new stations are being built with this in mind.

Along with escalators and stairs, many stations have elevators to take all passengers down

There are no elevators for general use in the subway

Metro stations have no public toilets

Metro stations have no public toilets

Some stations have newsstands and vending machines with newspapers, food and drinks on the platforms

Vending kiosks are only on station halls, not platforms.

There are practically no beggars, homeless people, or strolling musicians on the subway.

Beggars, homeless people, and strolling musicians are an inseparable part of the subway.

There are special places for amateur musicians in the stations and underpasses, which are rarely empty.

Musicians, sometimes very professional, are found in the passages and hallways, but spontaneously.

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Stops are announced by men’s and women’s voices, depending on the direction of the traffic.

Stops are announced by men’s and women’s voices, depending on the direction of the traffic.

Metro employees go on strike several times a year

Metro workers do not go on strike.

> There are special seats for amateur musicians in the stations and underpasses, which are rarely empty. There are comfortable places which are not empty. ZS. The orchestra at the transition from Teatralnaya to Ploshchad Revolutsii is especially pleasant. They play well and play a lot of them, and in general – the classics, even though they’re pop (in the sense of – well-known, like Bach’s “Joke”).

Beautiful! And nicely summed up, “Subway workers go on strike several times a year.” – “Subway workers don’t go on strike” :)

I would also add that the London Underground has two types-sizes of carriages: “almost like in Moscow”, and with low semi-circular roofs. They have the same track width, but the “big” carriages won’t always be able to “fit” into the tunnels for the small ones. In Moscow, any train will “fit” on any line.

In the London Underground, trains of different lines pass through the same tracks. For example, trains of some other lines pass through different sections of the “ring”, besides trains of the ring line itself. In Moscow each line has its own tracks.

And, by the way, 12 years ago, different stations closed at different times. I don’t know how now. Because I had to go to Harrow (a suburb to the west), and somewhere in the center I went down to the Baker Street station, where I could catch a train to Harrow. At the station an elderly negro with a broom politely explained to me that trains wouldn’t be running here until tomorrow. I didn’t want to mess with the night buses, so I briskly blew on foot to Baker Street. And then I got on the train, and not even on the last one.

All right, already pointed out to me about the first point about the cars, I’ll collect comments and proapdayuchu table thank you!

How the number of stations is calculated?

In Moscow, the intersection of several branches means different stations. For example, Tverskaya, Pushkinskaya and Chekhovskaya are like three separate stations, and in London, Oxford Circus is three stations of three branches: Victoria, Bakerloo and Central.

Yes, how do you count, for example, Taganskaya + Marxist? There are two stations, but three lines intersect.

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