Ghost towns from around the world.

25 spooky ghost towns around the world

Most of these abandoned and derelict settlements bring fear and anxiety. There are no people in them, no life. There is nothing. They are cities with terrible fates, destroyed by wars and banditry, floods and hurricanes. The very description of such places can make you feel uncomfortable, and to visit them…

Centralia, USA

Photo: Cole Young / CC 2.0 / Flickr

In 1962, for some unknown reason, the coal reserves beneath the town caught fire. Hard coal can burn for a very long time, all it needs is access to oxygen. Even now, Sentreilia is burning from the inside out, with clouds of smoke billowing out of cracks in the ground.

Pripyat, Ukraine

Photo: Denis Reznik / Pixabay

In April 1986, there was a disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant that contaminated everything around the plant with radiation. The town of Pripyat, whose residents were evacuated soon after the accident, found itself in the created exclusion zone. Radiation levels have decreased these days, and Pripyat is visited by street artists and photographers. But prolonged stay in the radiation-soaked town is dangerous to your health.

The city is notorious for its high radiation levels, France.

Photo: 42spain / Pixabay

On June 10, 1944, SS troops entered a French village. The Nazis killed everyone they could. More than 600 men were shot, all the women and children were driven into the local church and then burned alive. The settlement was deliberately left without reconstruction by the French government – it serves as a memorial to the victims of the senseless brutality of war.

Puppet Island, Mexico

Photo: Wikipedia

This island on the lake seems to have been taken from a horror movie. Hundreds of creepy, decomposing dolls are hung across it. The entire “entourage” was created by one man – Don Julián Santana. The man allegedly covered the island with dolls in memory of a girl who drowned in the lake. Santana himself drowned in the same lake in 2001.

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Okpo Land, South Korea

Photo: Pennhurst State School & Hospital / Facebook

one of the most famous amusement parks in Asia, Okpo Land was transformed almost overnight. In 1999, a duck-shaped cart went off the slide rail and hit a girl to death. It wasn’t the first incident: A few years earlier, a man had died on the same ride, but the park remained open. After the second death, the owner disappeared for fear of punishment, and the entire amusement park became a frightening, dilapidated place.

Tewarga, Libya

Residents of this Libyan town were driven from their homes by resistance forces because they supported the Gaddafi regime. He was overthrown and killed in 2011, but the former inhabitants are still forbidden to return to the town – it is guarded by troops.

Bodi, USA

Photo: Vleyva / Pixabay

During the gold rush, Bodie was one of the main crime centers of the Wild West. Robbery, murder, drunkenness and prostitution were rampant there. After the fall in the price of gold, the town began to become deserted, and two fires finally destroyed it. Now Bodie has been turned into a reenactment of a Wild West town.

Katoba, USA

Photo: Wikipedia

The city was Alabama’s first state capital, but it was blighted by natural disasters. Numerous floods and devastation after the U.S. Civil War turned Catoba into a .

Pyramid, Norway

Photo: Wikipedia

The mining village of Pyramid in the Svalbard Archipelago belonged to the Soviet Union, but was abandoned in the nineties, after the collapse of the USSR. The situation was exacerbated by a terrible car crash: a plane crashed very close to the town, and several of the remaining residents were injured. In 1998 the Pyramid was finally deserted.

Tiangducheng, China

Photo: Reuters

The town is an exact replica of downtown Paris, with a population of 10,000. In reality, however, no one lives there, and Tianducheng is just a strange place, unused and unneeded.

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Fordlandia, Brazil

Henry Ford bought a plantation in Brazil, hoping to gain a foothold in the South American market and get rubber for tires from his own sources. Fordlandia was supposed to be a workers’ paradise, but it became hell for the workers: the trees used to make the rubber were sick and withering and the working conditions were unbearable. In the end, the project was shut down, but the small town remained.

Salisbury Plain, United Kingdom

The town of Imber Photo: Euromag.ru

During World War II, camps for the training of soldiers were established on this territory. All residents of the surrounding villages were withdrawn so as not to interfere with the drill processes. To this day, no one is allowed back in, although tourists can visit several abandoned towns and villages.

Döllersheim, Austria

Photo: Wikipedia

Adolf Hitler’s parents lived in this Austrian town. After the Anschluss, when Germany gained control of Austria, the Führer ordered the bombing of Döllersheim for unknown reasons. There are hypotheses that the dictator did this to hide certain details of his life from the public.

Six Flags New Orleans Park, USA

Photo: Wikipedia

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and hundreds of thousands of homes were destroyed and abandoned. One of the hard hit areas was Six Flags New Orleans Amusement Park, which was left to its own devices and is now a creepy place full of half-decomposed clown statues and abandoned rides.

Balowill, USA.

Photo: Wikipedia

A sugar plantation in Florida was ravaged and burned during one of the raids. But the remains of the lord’s homestead, mill, and slave barracks remain. Balouille is now turned into an archaeological park.

Krako, Italy

Photo: Mele Coronato / Pixabay

Founded back in the Middle Ages, the village of Craco survived a lot: the plague, wars, and devastation. But it could not resist nature: in the XX century it was destroyed by a landslide. Destroyed village was abandoned, but it was able to remind the world of itself as a set for the movie “The Passion of the Christ.

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Hashima Island, Japan

Photo: Cassty1 / Pixabay

Like many other thriving cities, the settlement on Hashima has lived exactly as long as the mine under the island. the island had the highest population density in Japan, and now only film crews of post-apocalyptic movies wander there.

Bokor Station, Cambodia

Photo: Wikipedia

Cambodia has always been a troubled country, and the abandoned settlements are clear proof of its troubled past. Bokor Station was built by the French, then abandoned by them, then it was used as an outpost by the Khmer Rouge, but they left Bokor too. So the station was abandoned twice.

St. Mary’s College, USA

Photo: Imgur.com

Nicknamed the “House of Hell,” St. Mary’s College of Maryland was abandoned after a fire, the cause of which could not be determined. New buildings for the institute were erected nearby, and the old ruins became an inexhaustible source of urban horror stories and legends.

Kowloon, China

Photo: Wikipedia

Kowloon was the center of crime in Hong Kong, ruled by gangsters and the Mafia. The Chinese government decided in 1987 to destroy this hotbed of drugs and gambling. Kowloon was demolished but the ruins are still there.

Agdam, Azerbaijan

Photo: Wikipedia

Aghdam was the center of the war between Azerbaijan and Armenia, a coveted territory for both countries. Fierce battles took place there, which resulted in the complete destruction of the city. Aghdam became a model of the expression “If not for me, then for no one.”

Argentina

Photo: Wikipedia

The seaside village of Epecuen, full of resorts and , became a victim of floods and storms, turning into Argentina’s Atlantis. The town has been under water for about 25 years, and only now it is gradually being revived.

Poveglia, Italy

Anyone who would do harm to society, from criminals to the sick with contagious diseases, was exiled to this island not far from Venice and left behind. The island of Povella has become synonymous with death.

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Colmanskop, Namibia

Photo: Sandra G. Phillips / Pixabay

A mining village like Pyramid or Hasima. Only instead of coal, Colmanskop mined diamonds. They were mined for almost 40 years, and when the mines dried up, so did the people. Now the town is gradually being eaten away by the advancing desert.

Bannack, USA

Photo: Mike Goad / Pixabay

Bannack, Montana is very similar to Bodie, but its case is even worse. The same hotbed of crime, the town didn’t even depend on gold supplies – its residents simply killed each other off, and those who didn’t want to kill anyone escaped.

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