Berlin, Bodenmais, Bonn and Bremen: interesting cities in Germany

Top 20 German cities to visit

Berlin is the capital of Germany, Europe’s second most populous city, a hospitable, tolerant, lively, cozy and modern city. They say that Berlin doesn’t charm the way Paris, Rome or Barcelona do, but it’s worth giving it a chance and taking a closer look, walking its streets, sitting in its coffee houses, talking to locals. And then it will be impossible not to fall in love with it.

Brandenburg Gate in Berlin (photo: @enzo.grasso) Berlin Cathedral (photo: @sgregoryfit)

Munich

The capital of Bavaria, the largest region in southern Germany known for its brewing culture, Munich enchants with the picturesque architecture of its center, castles and palaces, bell towers, cathedrals and numerous green parks.

New town hall in Munich (photo: @christina_wallner_) Marienplatz in Munich (photo: @jovanivan)

Frankfurt am Main

The largest city in Hesse, Frankfurt combines old architecture and charming, picturesque half-timbered houses with modern architecture and skyscrapers, without which it would not be possible to live as an important economic center. Frankfurt am Main is also home to the headquarters of German and international companies as well as a multitude of interesting museums.

Skyscrapers of Frankfurt am Main (photo: @freiraum77) Old Town of Frankfurt am Main (photo: @ana_djurickovic)

Hamburg

One of Europe’s largest ports, Hamburg is not without that touristy charm that makes travelers walk its streets capturing everything in photos. Hamburg stands on the Elbe, where the river meets the North Sea, which gives it a special atmosphere imbued with severity and romance at the same time. Hamburg ranks first in Europe by the number of bridges, of which there are more than 2000. Also in the city there are more than fifty museums, a hundred and fifty parks, many theaters, 17 universities.

Hamburg’s Old Town (photo: @typisch_hamburch) Hamburg is the largest German port (photo: @lemmerpedia)

Cologne

Cologne lies on both banks of the Rhine between Bonn and Dusseldorf in western Germany. Many people come here just to see the majestic St. Peter and Mary Cathedral in Cologne. This is the main attraction of the city, a masterpiece of Gothic architecture, which miraculously survived the war.

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Cologne Cathedral (photo: @bjcouple) Cologne architecture (photo: @rober_i_ta)

Dresden

Dresden is located in eastern Germany, about 50 km from the Czech border and more than 100 km from the Polish border. Dresden is called the “Florence on the Elbe” for its dazzling baroque architecture, a city of art and culture that draws visitors from all over the world.

Dresden Gallery (photo: @traveler_places) Dresden Old Town architecture (photo: @dresden_city)

Leipzig

Leipzig is an hour’s drive from Dresden and is the largest city in Saxony. The city is closely connected with the names of great artists such as Bach, Goethe, Mendelssohn, Wagner and Schumann, who lived and worked here, and the Leipzig Opera House is one of the oldest in Europe. The Bach Festival, the Documentary and Animated Film Festival and the Leipzig Trade Fair are held here every year.

Sunset Leipzig (photo: @der_per) Modern Leipzig (photo: @emmaabdul_)

Schwerin

A charming city in northern Germany, less than an hour’s drive from the Baltic coast, Schwerin is small but very beautiful and rich in sights and scenic views. Schwerin is situated in a lake system and is mostly on the left bank of Lake Schweriner See. The city is famous for its central landmark, the beautiful Schwerin Castle, built in the Renaissance style.

Schwerin Castle (photo: @kleinstadtblog.de) Schwerin Old Town (photo: @lommy)

Heidelberg (Heidelberg)

Heidelberg is located in one of the most climatically favorable regions of Germany, which accounts for its flora and fauna, distinguishing it from other German states and European regions. The main attraction is Heidelberg Castle, but also worth seeing is the old bridge over the Neckar, the Neuburg Abbey and the Knights Hotel, built at the end of the 16th century. The city is also full of museums and beautiful old buildings that miraculously survived the war.

View of Heidelberg (photo: @labeautedelavie) Heidelberg Castle (photo: @targaryenblood)

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Weimar

A small town in Thuringia with typical German architecture with half-timbered houses, but certainly interesting for the traveler, primarily because of the legendary people who lived here. Composer Johann Sebastian Bach lived and worked in Weimar, painter Christian Richter, writers such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Friedrich Schiller and Friedrich Nietzsche spent their last years here. They all left their mark on the image of modern Weimar, in its monuments, memorials, archives and house museums.

Weimar half-timbered houses (photo: @olga_arribas) Weimar Castle (photo: @u_waynes_world)

Dusseldorf

Along with Berlin, Frankfurt, Munich and Hamburg, Düsseldorf is on the list of Germany’s major economic, political, educational and cultural centers. Don’t expect an abundance of ancient architecture outside the historic center of Dusseldorf. It is a very lively, modern and dynamic city with lots of fashionable boutiques, shopping and business centers, restaurants and bars.

Düsseldorf Ferris wheel (photo: @rosukarina) Düsseldorf’s modern architecture (photo: @gtsmk)

Rothenburg ob der Tauber

A small but incredibly beautiful German town with picturesque postcard views. Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a sister city to our Suzdal, with which it is connected by a common atmosphere of cozy beauty and charm in a small area.

Cozy and picturesque Rothenburg ob der Tauber (photo: @bjoern.dresel) Plenlein Square in Rothenburg (photo: @_y_u_k_a______)

Bamberg

An ancient city in Bavaria, called the “German Rome”, whose historical heritage has been recognized by UNESCO. Like other Bavarian towns, Bamberg has its own brewing tradition and is home to the world famous Bamberg Symphony Orchestra, founded in 1946 by emigrants from Prague.

Bamberg architecture (photo: @trama.ba) Bamberg Old Town Hall (photo: @jari_a_u)

Quedlinburg

Quedlinburg is a small, ancient German city that attracts tourists with its old half-timbered houses. The city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with more than 1,600 buildings over 600 years old. It is in Quedlinburg where the film “Franz” by François Ozon takes place.

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The old town of Quedlinburg (photo: @valentine_zeiger) The half-timbered architecture of Quedlinburg (photo: @aaron_leipzig)

Nuremberg

The second largest city in Bavaria after Munich, Nuremberg was almost completely destroyed during World War II, and then carefully rebuilt. It is this fact that gives the architectural face of the city this neat beauty, combining the atmospheric and “polished” characteristic of reconstruction.

Nuremberg has several beautiful churches, the German National Museum, the Toy Museum and the Center for Industrial Culture. The main attraction is the Nuremberg Castle, a medieval architectural ensemble with an old town, dungeons, wells, town halls, towers.

Nuremberg architecture (photo: @juana_viera) Nuremberg Fortress (photo: @juana_viera)

Stuttgart

The capital of Baden-Württemberg, one of Germany’s main economic, industrial and cultural centers, located about a hundred kilometers from the border with France. Stuttgart is considered one of the greenest cities in Europe thanks to its many parks and gardens. In addition, the city has many schools, educational and research centers, four castles of historical significance, churches and cathedrals, many museums. Among the latter are the Porsche Museum, the Mercedes-Benz Museum, the wine museum and even the Pig Museum.

Stuttgart Monastery Church (photo: @anupama1990) Stuttgart Architecture (photo: @whitevintagetravel)

Bremen

Bremen is known to anyone who has read a fairy tale or watched a cartoon about the musicians of Bremen, who of course have a monument here. Bremen usually does not often appear in lists of beautiful or interesting cities in Germany, which tourists should visit, and many people think it is a small provincial and unremarkable town. But in fact, this is not true.

First of all, Bremen is the tenth most populous German city (over 500 thousand people). And secondly, it is always ready to please the traveler and his postcard views with bright houses and majestic buildings of the historic center, miraculously survived the war. Bremen’s market square is considered one of the most beautiful in all of Europe.

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Bremen Market Square (photo: @giggart) Bremen Old Town (photo: @claudiofran)

Lübeck

A German port on the Baltic Sea, located about an hour northeast of Hamburg. The old city of Lübeck with its main landmarks is listed by UNESCO. Among them is the Holstentor, the “Holstein Gate”, a symbol of the city and a rare example of Gothic brickwork.

Lübeck’s waterfront (photo: @kohlori.de) Burgthor Gate in Lübeck (photo: @thomasozbun)

Bonn is in eastern Germany, a hundred kilometers from the border with France, just half an hour from Cologne and also stands on the Rhine. From 1949 to 1991, Bonn was the capital of the Federal Republic of Germany and after the reunification of Germany and the moving of its center to Berlin, although it became more quiet and serene, it has not lost its political importance for the country. Bonn is closely connected with the name of Ludwig van Beethoven, who was born here.

The obelisk fountain in Bonn’s Market Square (photo: @jennyvonwestphalen) Bonn University Botanical Gardens (photo: @theotheo87)

Augsburg

Augsburg, the capital of the historical Swabian region, founded by the Romans in 15 B.C., is considered the oldest city in Germany after Trier. In the 15th century Augsburg became the most important European center for the art of jewelry. Today the Augsburg city hall, built in 1385, is the city’s main tourist attraction and its visiting card.

Augsburg has been home to many famous people in different periods, including members of the art world, as well as well-known bankers, patrons of the arts and businessmen. Their family homes are now landmarks of the city, open to tourists.

Augsburg Town Hall Square (photo: @stef_boni) Evening Augsburg (photo: @xoonxee)

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